Tag Archives: usmle

USMLE Step 1 and 2 Studies on the Go: Utah Web Path

University of Utah Web PathologyFor those of you who have not yet found a good source for quick free online pathology review, we recommend checking out the University of Utah WebPath site.

The site breaks down major path areas and provides images with specific gross images and histological slides of most major pathology items that come up on Step 1 and Step 2. Utah WebPath QR CodeWe don’t recommend this as a sole pathology study suite, but there’s no better place that helps with image pattern recognition. The site is easy enough to navigate without an explanation here. Check it out.

Posted in Boards | Tagged , , , , , , , , |
Used this resource? Leave your impressions.

USMLE Step 1 Series: Making a Withdrawal at the Question Bank

How to Choose USMLE Step 1 Question BanksYou’ve heard whispers around your medical school of a variety of question banks to use during boards, and there are a lot. To be specific, this article is going to hit on the main points of question banks only, not to be confused with the variety of coaching or training programs out there.

As mentioned in the opening article of the USMLE Step 1 Series, choosing a question bank has little dependence on your individual learning style. Before we get into the individual options, it’s important to note that this can be one of the largest detriments to your student loans for the Step 1 exam, outside of the exam itself. While we always encourage smart purchases, this is not a time to be frugal. You should purchase a question bank, and round up on the time compared to your exam (e.g. if you exam is 1.5 months away, get a 2 or 3 month subscription). Never try to “exact fit” a question bank with your pre-determined study time. Overestimate slightly.

This is our top recommendation, without question. When groups of medical students are surveyed about resources, this is consistently rated the highest of the question banks, with around 95% of students who used it rating it “Very Good” or “Excellent” after taking the Step 1. (Evidence for the win!) Buy it.

Review: The interface and question types are the closest approximation to the actual FRED2 format you will find on the actual Step 1 exam. More importantly, the question stems and content are in a similar style. Difficulty overall is slightly higher than the real deal, but at an appropriate level that doesn’t feel ridiculous like some of the other question banks. Answers are comprehensive, high yield, and fulfilling. Performance is tracked by subject and topic, but overall analytics leave something to be desired at times as improvement-graphing is not a feature. While tracking progress can be reassuring during this stressful time, it’s not why students should purchase a question bank. This is a large cost, so as a (repeated) point of disclosure, MedStudentBooks receives absolutely no benefit or compensation from USMLE World.

USMLE World Step 1 Question Bank

Usage: You should do questions every day you study, with a heavy focus on the topic you just reviewed. Some questions every day should be general (randomly chosen) questions. This number should increase as you get closer to the exam date. Number of questions should be tailored to individual learning style. However, if you find yourself burning through the question bank quickly and expect to finish it early, we recommend saving approximately 300 for the very last week of studying. Purchasing a second question bank (see below) is only recommended for this scenario for those who really excel by doing questions.

USMLERx comes from the group that makes First Aid for the USMLE Step 1. Questions are true to the exam in content and difficulty, with great answer breakdowns. This corresponding question bank to First Aid does extend past the book’s knowledge and can be used as a true supplement (not just rehashing the exact same content), which is why it represents our runner-up question bank recommendation. When surveyed, about 60% of students who used this question bank rated it as Very Good or Excellent. One money-saving tip is to use the corresponding book First Aid Q & A for the USMLE Step 1 (often referred to as “paper USMLERx”) and/or First Aid Cases for the USMLE Step 1. This last title is actually not a question book, but rather goes over cases with multiple questions that could come up for any given question stem. Unlike question banks, this is usually self-selected by those whose learning style works well. Furthermore, either of these titles can be picked up used or borrowed from friends. Keep a lookout for your medical school hosting a USMLERx “Scholarship” which is code-word for “promotional free qbank subscription that coincidentally creates free advertising.”

Kaplan tends to get extreme opinions. People either love it or hate it. When a class of med students were surveyed, 30% of those who used Kaplan Qbank rated it as Very Good or Excellent. As opposed to the above two options, Kaplan takes a different approach, by asking questions that do NOT approximate the Step 1 exam in style. Questions usually focus on specific factoids, and are sometimes perceived as being detailed minutia. Nevertheless, some people swear this is a helpful method of studying. If you are curious about this option, you can use the above link or below banner ad to check a free trial before purchasing it. Either way, it shouldn’t be your first choice.

NEW Step 1 QBank- Only $99-$199!

Other Questions Banks to Mention

What about the NBME?! As we mentioned in the opening article in the Step 1 series, everyone should take an initial Comprehensive Basic Science Self-Assessment (CBSSA) exam to get some hard evidence of performance. While these are great at providing a big picture of strengths and weaknesses, these exams unfortunately do not provide great answer descriptions or aid in learning. The NBME has started rolling out exams with “Enhanced Feedback” but they still don’t match up to any of the above as learning tools, and wind up being more expensive per question.

USMLE Consult: This is the question bank famous for being backed by the Great Goljan. We love Goljan’s teaching, but we don’t have enough evidence on USMLE Consult to say it’s necessarily a strong choice. Without the Goljan stamp of approval, this option would probably fade into the background with many other countless banks. 

Exam Master: Many med schools provide this to students for free. The price tag reflects the quality. This has a lot of negative reviews and responses associated with it. Questions are unfocused, unclear, and often times have poor answer explanations. Learn from med students who came before, and avoid dedicating time to this option. If you are interested in free questions, hit up the question banks that come with many new books (check for scratch-off areas on the inside cover) or use the Lippincott free 350 question set.

USMLE Weapon: This Pittsburgh startup gets a curious honorable mention as a rising question bank gaining popularity. While USMLE Weapon has not yet stood the test of time or produced a lot of evidence regarding its perceived value, it has impressive analytics and may yet give USMLE World a run for their money one day. At this point though, MedStudentBooks cannot endorse this option, but we will be following it for future years.

Posted in Boards | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |
1 Impression on this resource so far. What's yours?

USMLE Step 1 Series: The Right Way to Use First Aid for the USMLE Step 1

There comes that point, usually midway through first year, when every medical student hears about First Aid as the magical end-all Step 1 study book. “Everything I could possibly need to know for the largest exam of my life in one book?! Sounds too good to be true!”  It is.

First Aid for the USMLE Step 1, reviewed here previously, is absolutely essential for the first board exam experienced by medical students. However, it is incomplete. Before discussing the manner in which it can be fortified, let’s address the first question that usually arises: When do I actually buy a copy of First Aid and start studying from it?

You will likely encounter several gunners in your class who bought their copy of First Aid as soon as they finished the MCAT. This is not recommended. In fact, going through all of first year med school without ever seeing First Aid is probably a good thing. The summer between first and second year is the gray zone, and depends on your personal learning style. No medical student should start studying for boards at this point. However, some people find it helpful to begin familiarizing themselves with the layout and teaching style of the book. It can be especially helpful to students taking organ system based courses to skim through corresponding chapters of First Aid. However, study time should be dedicated to medical school classes, not the boards at that point. If you decide to use this method, try to find an older copy of First Aid that costs little or no money. If you purchase the latest version during the summer after first year, a newer version will come out by time you take the boards.

Power-Annotatation
First Aid for the USMLE Step 1 Remove the CoverRegardless of whether you “pre-skim” or not, purchase a new copy of the latest edition for the start of your dedicated USMLE Step 1 study period. Your job, over the subsequent 6-8 weeks, is to fill in all the information left out of First Aid. How do you know what you don’t know? Other resources, namely question banks. As you begin to read through the list of in-depth support books we previously mentioned and take Step 1 styled questions, you’ll find the factoids and concepts First Aid missed. While the tradition has historically been to write these high yield ideas in the margins, each revision of First Aid has produced less and less white-space on a page.

This has been addressed in a few ways. The simplest is to simply shove extra loose pieces of paper between pages of the book. Unfortunately, dropping the book once produces a disorganized mess of notes. The recommended option is disassembling the book. While harming the Step 1 bible may seem sacrilegious, it has many benefits. First and foremost, it makes transportation much easier, as grabbing an individual chapter is a lot easier than lugging around the entire book along with all your other study materials. More importantly, it can keep things very well organized.

As seen above, a standard three ring binder allows for easy organization and insertion of extra pages.  Some people prefer spiral binding or similar plastic ends that have easy open and close mechanisms. It’s up to you. As for getting your copy of First Aid into these states, we don’t recommend doing it yourself. You can usually get anything you’d like done at your local Kinkos or Staples for less than $5.

There are a lot of opinions on what should be placed on extra pages, without much consensus. Some people insist on putting sources to their facts for later reference, others don’t care. All we advise is to use your usual study practices, with one exception. There are a few of us who never take notes. You know who you are. Step 1 does not afford you that luxury, regardless of how amazing your short term memory is. There’s just too much information. Bottom line: annotate First Aid.

Alright, you’re all set to get the most out of your copy of First Aid. Don’t forget to check out the back of the book for common buzzword associations. You should have all of them down by time you hit the exam. Happy studies!

 

Posted in Boards | Tagged , , , , , , , , |
3 Impressions on this resource so far. What's yours?

USMLE Step 1 Series: The Exam Survival Sweepstakes is Now Open

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Medical Education LogoWe’ve been collaborating with Lippincott to create a giveaway that addresses some of the major aspects of USMLE Step 1 Studying. Along with several books, the Step 1 Exam Survival Sweepstakes includes some gift cards to keep you entertained and caffeinated, and an extra shirt so you can put off laundry day just a little more. Head over to Lippincott’s facebook page and sign up for a chance to win:

Q&A Review of Microbiology and Immunology
Lippincott’s Microcards, Third Edition
Lippincott’s Illustrated Reviews: Biochemistry
Board Review Series (BRS) Physiology
$25 iTunes gift card
$25 Starbucks gift card
Lippincott t-shirt
Lippincott water bottle

As with all other giveaways on this site, this contest is similarly limited to US residents. End date is May 7, 2012, just in time for the start of most med school’s Step 1 break. Good luck!

Posted in Boards | Tagged , , , , , |
Used this resource? Leave your impressions.

USMLE Step 1 Series: How to Survive

Congratulations on finishing second year of medical school!  Now what? The dreaded USMLE Step 1 exam.

United States Medical Licensing Examination - Step 1

Discussing all the aspects of Step 1 is easily overwhelming and exhausting. It’s not unusual for medical schools to host stress-inducing class-wide meetings to throw loads of information at med students at one time. It can be a bit much. As we head into boards season, MedStudentBooks.com will provide bite sized posts on how to tackle all the tough topics, through the USMLE Step 1 Series of posts.

Lippincott Step 1 Free Book Contest

In addition to helpful information from senior med students, we will continue to bring you free book giveaways. Earlier in the season, we gave away a free copy of First Aid for the USMLE Step 1 2012.  Tomorrow, however, is our largest contest to date. We have collaborated with the fine folks at Lippincott to bring you the 2012 Exam Survival Sweepstakes. Full contest details will be posted tomorrow, but we can’t help but hint that it contains the majority of MedStudentBooks.com recommended titles for Step 1 studying, and some gift cards.

To get all the latest tips and tricks to tackling the boards and getting that extra edge on Step 1, be sure to check back to the site frequently, or follow us on Twitter.

Posted in Boards | Tagged , , , , , , |
Used this resource? Leave your impressions.

Lange Case Files Pathology: For Your Review

Lange Case Files: PathologyLange’s Case Files Pathology is a book whose purpose is to integrate our knowledge of pathology for diagnosing realistic scenarios in medicine.  There are 50 clinical cases written in clear USMLE-style format.  For each clinical case, there are four parts: 1) a summary with straightforward answers and clinical correlations, 2) basic science concepts including objectives and definitions followed by a brief discussion of the topic of interest, 3) a few comprehensive questions that reinforce key points, and 4) “pathology pearls”, which are important take-home points.   When going through each case, important information is bolded for emphasis and explanations are concise and precise—eliminating the trivial concepts that should have become second nature by the end of organ systems.  This means that this book is not for learning materials, but rather more effectively used as a tool for review, reinforcement, and integration of learnt information to allow for synthesis.

Although all Case Files books may or may not fit the needs of boards review, Case Files Pathology is a book that can only help.  With key take-home points and short-and-sweet explanations of case material, you should have little problem learning the essentials—the fundamental architecture of clinical pathology.  For example, you may come across a case of ventricular septal defect (VSD), requiring you to utilize your knowledge of epidemiology, embryology, physiology, and the clinical presentations of cardiac defects. Of course, take note that this book is for pathophysiology and not just for lab-based pathology, so a good foundation in second year organ blocks material would make this book much more useful for synthesis of all the loosely connected information.

The downside of Case Files Path includes: 1) lack of pictures and images to allow the medical student to truly appreciate the clinical appearance of certain diseases, 2) lack of explanations for various diagnostic tests that may be useful for understanding the diagnostic and elimination process, and 3) the multiple choice review questions at the end of each case are generally very simple and superficial questions asking more for recall than synthesis, despite the fact that the case itself is pretty good at elucidating the more detailed aspects of disease.

Overall, Case Files Pathology would be great to have for some last minute studying or USMLE Step 1 board review, but definitely not for the initial phase of studying. Get the foundation down solid, and then use this book to cement everything together. As for where to use this book, it is not a useful resource for studying for medical school classes since the cases in the book is written in USMLE format rather than in the format of questions on medical school examinations. However, it is definitely a good book to have at the end of your studies for USMLE Step 1 to get the bigger picture and practice applying medical knowledge to realistic medical cases, uncertainties and all.

 

Posted in Boards, Pre-clinical Years | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , |
Used this resource? Leave your impressions.

First Aid USMLE Step 1 2012 Errata Posted

First Aid USMLE Step 1 2012 reviewFor those interested in making corrections to information in your copy of First Aid for the USMLE Step 1 2012, the official FA errata is now posted to the FirstAidTeam.com website.  You can check out the webpage to learn more about the process, or RSS subscribe for updates. If you’d like to bypass the site and just go straight to the errata, the document can be found here (pdf).

Contribute to First AidKeep in mind that you can send in a correction for any mistake you find by clicking on the “Contribute” button on the right side of their site or this post (both bring you to the same place on their site). While they promise $20 Amazon gift cards for new information, someone else has probably already beaten you to any given correction. Nonetheless, making any submission will get your name printed in the preceding version of Step 1.

Posted in Boards | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |
1 Impression on this resource so far. What's yours?

USMLE Score Percentile Calculator, Now Live

USMLE Percentile CalculatorAnother online Med Student Books application has been recently added to the site!

Has a scholarship or program been asking for a USMLE Step 1 “percentile” even though no such number can be found on your Step 1 score report?  Perhaps you’re simply interested in tracking progress of USMLE World practice tests. Whatever the reason, head over to our new USMLE Percentile Calculator to convert between three digit score and percentile.

It uses some recent national data, but can be customized for your specific needs, and extended for Step 2 percentiles. Have a look, and if you find it useful, be sure to share with friends!

Posted in Boards | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , |
1 Impression on this resource so far. What's yours?