Tag Archives: usmle step 2

USMLE Step 1 and 2 Studies on the Go: Utah Web Path

University of Utah Web PathologyFor those of you who have not yet found a good source for quick free online pathology review, we recommend checking out the University of Utah WebPath site.

The site breaks down major path areas and provides images with specific gross images and histological slides of most major pathology items that come up on Step 1 and Step 2. Utah WebPath QR CodeWe don’t recommend this as a sole pathology study suite, but there’s no better place that helps with image pattern recognition. The site is easy enough to navigate without an explanation here. Check it out.

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USMLE Score Percentile Calculator, Now Live

USMLE Percentile CalculatorAnother online Med Student Books application has been recently added to the site!

Has a scholarship or program been asking for a USMLE Step 1 “percentile” even though no such number can be found on your Step 1 score report?  Perhaps you’re simply interested in tracking progress of USMLE World practice tests. Whatever the reason, head over to our new USMLE Percentile Calculator to convert between three digit score and percentile.

It uses some recent national data, but can be customized for your specific needs, and extended for Step 2 percentiles. Have a look, and if you find it useful, be sure to share with friends!

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Déjà Review: USMLE Step 2 CK – Perfect for Some

Deja Review USMLE Step 2 CKStudents preparing to study for the USMLE Step 2 CK  should be well accustomed to the type of question encountered on the boards and shelf exams, and should have a decent sense of their own study habits and strengths. This is immensely important when deciding on a study plan for Step 2. The seemingly infinite clinical knowledge can be overwhelming, and a structured study plan truly helps.

Deja Review USMLE Step 2 CK, now in its second edition, continues to get mixed reviews by students studying for the boards. The format of the book is very straight forward: alternating sections of clinical vignettes, and rapid-fire two-column recall question and answers. The book goes through each of the core clerkship specializations that will be found on the USMLE Step 2 exam, starting with Internal Medicine, and progressing through Surgery, Neurology, Psychiatry, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pediatrics, and finally Emergency Medicine. It is not a text book, or even a comprehensive review book such as First Aid, and as such should not be relied upon to learn new concepts. Its strength is purely in aiding with recall and making buzz word connections, and it does that very well.

However, the lack of teaching can be frustrating for students who do not already know or remember the material. DejaReview Step 2 CK shouldn’t replace question banks either. There are no answer explanations or experience in testing. Furthermore, the book is often times seen as unhelpful to students who do not learn well with recall type resources.

It is due to these reasons that there exists a split in outlook about this book. People who excel at rapid recall questions can easily carry this in a wide white coat pocket during the months preceding the USMLE Step 2 CK exam, for high yield on-the-go studying. It is a very strong review text that complements First Aid and USMLE World question banks, but it is not for everyone. Learning style really matters with this book, which is why there are such mixed feelings about it. If you are unsure of your learning style, it is recommended that you check out the format of the book before purchase. Try to browse through a copy at your medical library, or if you want to decide sooner, head over to Amazon, which gives a few of the question type pages found in the book. As far as price, Deja Review USMLE Step 2 CK gives a lot of bang in its 300+ pages for a low cost, so finding out it is not for you won’t set you back too far. Check out the links below to see what I mean.

 

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USMLE World QBank Group Discount!

USMLE World Question Bank (Qbank) group discounts for the USMLE Step 1 and Step 2 exams have historically not worked out.

Here’s the typical scenario: Someone from your med school tries to organize a group of at least 50 students to band together and take advantage of a group discount from USMLE World. 70 people express uncertain interest because they don’t know the timing or what they want. 30 sign up, and despite the majority of your class eventually gets USMLE World QBanks, everyone pays full price.  Meanwhile, individuals chase down google searches for USMLE World discounts and coupon pages, none of which are legit. At this point, the only way to pay less for USMLE World subscriptions is in group discounts.

In line with this site’s collaborative mission, this page was previously dedicated to providing a sign-up whereby medical students from different schools could come together as a larger group.  We unfortunately found out  that this too is not allowed. The minimum of 50 students must come from the same school and have the same domain in their e-mail address (yourmedschool.edu).  USMLE World representatives have also confirmed that no other discount exists anywhere for any reason outside of a minimum of 50 students from the same school. Sorry everyone.

 

Don’t forget to check out these other resources from the USMLE Step 1 Series:

How to Choose USMLE Step 1 Question Banks
Sorting Through Confusion: Making a Withdrawal at the Question Bank The 7 Essentials of a Solid Step 1 Study Strategy

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Nelson’s Essentials of Pediatrics – A Solid Med Student Reference Book

Nelson's Essentials of Pediatrics, Solid Med School Reference Book for the Pediatrics Clerkship

Nelson's Essentials of Pediatrics, A Solid Med School Reference Book for the Pediatrics Clerkship

There really aren’t a ton of great pediatrics books out there for the core clerkship, but Nelson’s Essentials of Pediatrics is just a solid reference book to provide the basis of med student studying.  It represents the condensed version of the 2680-page full version, Nelson’s Textbook of Pediatrics, often times referred to as the Pediatric Bible.  Nelson’s Essentials hits all the key common pediatrics issues, but at 864 pages, it’s a balance between manageable and comprehensive. Still, you’ll have to pick and choose which chapters are read straight through, because you won’t be able to shotgun this entire book in a reasonable amount of time.

The best study technique for pediatrics is to actually use a reference book such as this or Rudolph’s Fundamentals of Pediatrics (to be reviewed later) along with a number of question books such as Pre-Test Pediatrics, as well as online resources like UpToDate. Referencing Nelson’s Essentials of Pediatrics on each of your assigned patients is a great way to prepare for imminent pimping.  Again, as a larger book, it’s tough to read cover to cover, or even carry around to the wards, but it is reliable. With that being said, it also comes with Student Consult, which means you can scratch-off the key code inside the front cover to get access to the book electronically. As usual, this is perfect while roaming around the pediatric floors, and for snagging images for formal presentations.

Nelson’s Essentials of Pediatrics has some easy to understand, straight forward (but not overly amazing) diagrams and graphs. Again, it gets the job done.  The 204 Chapters are grouped into the following units: The Profession of Pediatrics, Growth and Development, Behavioral Disorders, Psychiatric Disorders, Psychosocial Issues (which comes up a lot on the pediatrics rotation), Pediatric Nutrition, Fluids and Electrolytes, The Acutely Ill or Injured Child (perfect for Pediatric Emergency as well), Human Genetics and Dysmorphology, Metabolic Disorders, Fetal and Neonatal Medicine, Adolescent Medicine, Immunology, Allergy, Rheumatic Disorders of Childhood, Infectious Diseases, Digestive System, Respiratory System, Cardiovascular System, Hematology, Oncology, Nephrology and Urology, Endocrinology, Neurology (useful for the Neurology shelf exam), Dermatology, and Orthopedics.

Again, this is a solid reference book, and a good companion during the Pediatric Clerkship.

 

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Robbins and Cotran Review of Pathology, AKA Red Robbins

Robbins and Cotran Pathology Review, AKA Red Robbins

Robbins and Cotran Pathology Review, AKA Red Robbins

Robbins and Cotran Review of Pathology, 3rd Edition, AKA “Red Robbins,” is the best pathology USMLE style question bank/book for the boards, and a great complement to Goljan’s review books and audio.  The true strength is mixing clinical scenarios with pathology concepts, which makes a topic that is easily boring for many medical students into a very relevant and high yield exercise in the thought process necessary for excelling in pre-clinical class exams, USMLE Step 1, USMLE Step 2 CK, and USMLE Step 3 boards.

The pertinent questions is: should this be used with a question bank such as USMLE World or Kaplan?  The answer is definitively yes. At some point, you’re going to hit up Goljan (to be reviewed later), and this book is what will lock in that information with an alternate perspective on the same topics.  This should not replace or be used as a substitute for a primary question bank. As for using it with “Big Robbins” or “Baby Robbins,” neither are really needed for the boards past Goljan.  At times you may want to reference these resources for topics that require a bit more detail, but they are not a necessity, and can usually be borrowed from friends or the library.  (Both of these will also be reviewed in more detail later.)

Robbins and Cotran Review of Pathology does a particularly good job of pulling glossy high resolution color microscopic and gross images that are actually representative of the pathology being reviewed. This really is one of the most important aspects of any pathology teaching.  Explanations are thorough, including why the wrong answers are wrong, and the questions are representative of what comes up on the boards.

The three major pathology review sections are comprehensive. Unit 1, General Pathology, covers Cellular Path, Acute and Chronic Inflammation, Tissue Renewal and Repair, Regeneration, Healing, Fibrosis, Hemodynamic Disorders, Thromboembolic Disease, Shock, Genetic Disorders, Diseases of Immunity, Neoplasia, Infectious Disease, Environmental and Nutritional Diseases, and Diseases of Infancy and Childhood.  Unit 2, Organ Systemic Pathology, has individual chapters on Blood Vessels, the Heart, Diseases of White Blood Cells, Lymph Nodes, the Spleen, the Thymus, Red Blood Cells and Bleeding Disorders, the Lung, Head and Neck Pathology, the Gastrointestinal Tract, Liver and Biliary Tracts, the Pancreas, the Kidney, the male and female lower urinary tract, the Breast, the Endocrine System, the Skin / Bones / Soft Tissue Tumors, Peripheral Nerve and Skeletal Muscle, the Central Nervous System, and the Eye.  Clearly, all of these chapters combined hit every organ system from the large to the microscopic, but I listed them as a reference.  The final Unit III, Integrative Reviews, has two long chapters on Clinical Pathology and a Final Review and Assessment that combines information from prior chapters.  Robbins and Cotran Pathology Review can also be purchased for Kindle as an eBook on Amazon, but that is not recommended.

 

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