Tag Archives: surgery books

Just for Orthopods: Handbook of Fractures

Egol's Handbook of Fractures 4th Edition

The 4th Edition of Handbook of Fractures by Egol, Koval, and Zuckerman, is a must-have for interested medical students and orthopaedics residents everywhere.  It contains the essentials for an orthopaedic rotation and will give you a great foothold on the foundation of the specialty.  Note that it is not an all-knowing book of knowledge, despite being a “go-to guide” for the fundamentals.   It is a very condense text of fractures, dislocations, and stabilization techniques for upper and lower extremities, pediatric cases, axial fractures and dislocations, and also general considerations for the important categories of gunshot, pathologic, and multiple trauma cases, just to name a few.

 

This handbook is divided into 5 major divisions with chapters under each division: I. General Considerations (7 chapters including: GSW, closed reduction/casting/traction, periprosthetic fractures, orthopaedic analgesia), II. Axial Skeleton Fractures (3 chapters including: general spine, cervical spine, thoracolumbar spine), III. Upper Extremity Fractures & Dislocations (14 chapters including: scapula fractures, distal radius fractures, hand fractures), IV. Lower Extremity Fractures & Dislocations (17 chapters including: acetabulum, femoral shaft, patella, calcaneus, talus), and V. Pediatric Fractures & Dislocation (11 chapters including: shoulder, elbow, hip, knee, ankle, and many more).

Egol’s Handbook of Fractures has a lot of text, but is easy to read because important words are bolded and there are quite a good set of illustrations that go along with essential concepts.  Most chapters are subdivided, very logical, touch on epidemiology, anatomy, mechanism of injury, clinical evaluation, radiographic evaluation, classifications of fracture/dislocation, treatment, nonoperative vs operative cases, complications, and rehabilitation.

The primary target audience of the Handbook of Fractures is orthopaedic residents.  It covers a wide range of important and must-know concepts needed to succeed in orthopaedic residency.  The ambitious MS3 who wants to end up on top in an orthopaedic elective clerkship may also find this book enlightening and useful for impressing some attendings and residents (don’t show off too much though, jealousy must be kept at bay!).

This book is certainly not recommended for medical school courses in general, as time spent reading it would be low yield for general surgery rotations. This book is also pretty much useless for the USMLE exams because orthopaedic fractures, dislocations, and other material presented in this book are just not the materials you’ll see on the boards.  If you want to use it to get ready for an elective in orthopaedic clerkship or plan to go into orthopaedic residency, then go right on ahead and invest in one. Otherwise, it is recommended that you skim a library copy as needed.

 

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Surgical Recall: Ultimate Pimping Handbook

Blackbroune Surgical Recall for Third Year Med StudentsSurgical Recall is one of those third year med student books that can be your secret phone-a-friend ace up your sleeve, and concurrently your downfall. There are a number of books you will encounter throughout medical school where the outcome of that class or clerkship is dependent on how the book is used. Just as you wouldn’t use Netter’s or Rohen’s to replace an anatomy text, Surgical Recall must be used properly.

As the title implies, Surgical Recall is your guide to all things pimping on surgery.  Unless surgery is your first rotation, you should already be aware that the pimping starts on the very first day. Accordingly, you should ideally grab a copy of this during the weekend before your surgery clerkship starts and dig in quite a bit by time you hit the first day.  This is the book that’s going to help you avoid looking like a total newbie, because common surgical etiquette and culture is not taught in preclinical classes.  This is the book that’s going to tell you all the usual abbreviations, the names of all the different scissors you enounter, why you should NEVER touch the mayo tray (and what that is), and all of the common pimp questions you will commonly encounter.

Like other books in the Recall series, Surgical Recall uses a split page question and answer format that quizzes the reader on all the common things seen in surgery.  The book does a good job in its use of pictures, especially on sections dedicated to surgical instruments and consumables.  This is important as most third year med students don’t know what a JP drain is, what JP stands for, what they look like, and how they are different from other drains. You could responsively google “JP drain” right now, but you won’t know the names of all the other commonly used tools, which is why this book is helpful.

The latest edition (as seen above) has taken on a somewhat retro look.  Perhaps market research has shown med students go for books that are already on fire to quell the need to later set them ablaze in frustration, or perhaps this just allows for the subsequent edition to look modernized in comparison. Nonetheless, we can’t judge a book by its cover, else the BRS series of books would have gone extinct long ago. The first section of Surgical Recall is going to touch on the big picture and background of surgery, including abbreviations, surgical signs, syndromes, cutting, suturing, tying, instruments, preoperative requirements, wound care, hemostasis, nutrition, shock, complications, and surgical anatomy pearls.  Section II goes over the main general surgery areas, including GI hormones, GI bleeds, hernias, laparoscopy, trauma, burns, bariatric surgery, appendicitis, ostomies, fistulas, IBD, portal hypertension, other hepatobiliary diseases, the breast, endocrine, melanoma, vascular, and intensive care unit knowledge.  The third and final section hits the surgical subspecialties, including pediatrics, plastics, hand, otolaryngology, thoracic, cardiovascular, transplant, orthopedics, neurosurgery, and urology.  This book is around 800 pages long, and while the question and answer format allows for a faster read, you should generally focus on the general surgery knowledge and the topics that specifically correspond to your surgical service.

Surgical Recall Illustrations: JP drain and Scalpels

Included with this latest version is the promise of free “Mobile Access.”  As of now, the jury is still out as to whether this is legitimate, as a number of students have had a hard time actually accessing it through their phones without paying the additional ~$45 app price through Android or Apple. It may be fixed in the future, but don’t purchase this book thinking it will instantly be on your phone.

Surgical Recall can be the downfall for the occasional medical student who believes this is the only book needed during surgery.  Indeed it will seem like a cheat sheet, whereby memorizing this book will produce superstar results in the operating room and floors (and it will).  However, the NBME Surgery Shelf Exam doesn’t care about the things that make awesome operating room medical students that get all the obscure attending questions. There is no Surgery Shelf question on one-handed ties, no Surgery Shelf question on drain choices, and no Surgery Shelf question on how your attending likes their coffee.  Make the distinction: there is OR / floor knowledge, and there is NBME Surgery Shelf exam knowledge, with a minority of overlap.  You need both to go for the gold on your surgery clerkship, and Surgical recall is the tool to help with the former.

 

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Jafek’s ENT Secrets, third edition

Jafek's ENT Secrets

Jafek's ENT Secrets

ENT Secrets, now in its third edition, is the next step up in otolaryngology texbooks for medical students.  Previously, this site discussed Primary Care Otolaryngology (reviewed here) as a light read to get through a mandatory ENT rotation or look knowledgeable about otolaryngology in a primary care setting. However, this is not an appropriate strategy for a med student on a sub-internship.  To hit the next level of looking awesome, we recommend ENT Secrets.

The benefit of this text book is that it is comprehensive enough for fourth year medical students to learn the fundamentals of every otolaryngology topic, without becoming a monster hardcover. Residents are more likely to reference Pasha or Lee (>1000 pages!), but these are a bit too large and extensive for most medical students on a one month rotation.  They are better suited for Ear-Nose-Throat boards, whereas ENT Secrets is better used for things like getting pimped, and not looking like a newbie.

As with many other books in the “Secrets” series, the book is broken down into subspecialties and reads in question and answer format, with numbered titles followed by detailed definitions of terms and scenarios.  You’ll get all the usual imaging and diagrams you would expect. This also comes with the online Student Consult.  Some of the features, such as online note taking, seem outright useless (please, someone comment if they disagree).  However the ability to access the text electronically means you can embrace the med student geek inside you and read while waiting for the bus.  It also means you can gank key figures and use them in powerpoint presentations.

If you’re about to hit your ENT sub-internship, this is the recommended book for you.  Otherwise, for mandatory clerkships, stick to the recommended reading, or Otolaryngology for Primary Care.

 

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Rohen’s Color Atlas of Anatomy: A Photographic Study of the Human Body

Rohen's Color Atlas of Anatomy: A Photographic Study of the Human Body

Rohen's Color Atlas of Anatomy: A Photographic Study of the Human Body

Rohen’s Color Atlas of Anatomy: A Photographic Study of the Human Body, more lovingly referred to simply as “Rohen’s” has a deceptive cover.  The anatomy picture on the front looks cartoonish, and the “color atlas” in the name sounds like it’s a coloring book. Do not overlook this med school anatomy book, as it is a big push to increasing your chance of getting Honors on your first med school class.

It is another anatomy atlas, yes, but instead of using drawings like Netter’s Atlas of Human Anatomy, it excels by using actual cadaver photographs to directly show the anatomy. What this means is that the images in Rohen’s Color Atlas of Anatomy closely approximate what will be seen on every one of your anatomy practical exams in full color, but without the smell of having to actually go into anatomy lab.  Later in third year, in comes in handy on surgery to identify key anatomic landmarks and surgical planes of dissection.

One of the other benefits of this atlas is that it labels structures with numbers which are referenced on another part of the page.  This legend can be covered, turning the Anatomy Atlas into an instant study guide for quizzing oneself on anatomic structures. It also comes with access to the online text, which makes it portable and viewable on many smart phones.

Some med students make the mistake of trying to bring this book into anatomy lab.  As with any other resource, the lab is not the place for Rohen’s Color Atlas of Anatomy unless you want to ruin your book.  Everyone at medstudentbooks has the utmost respect for cadaver donors, but this warning must be expressed: liquefied adipose and fixatives get over everything brought into the lab.  You do not want to bring that home on your books and have it touching anything else.  Use older free copies in the lab, even though they are mildly outdated, or hope your anatomy laboratory partners haven’t found this site or don’t care if their books are ruined.

The book hits on all of the expected anatomy, being everything.  The order of its units is as follows: General Anatomy Principles, Skull and Muscles of the Head, Cranial Nerves, Brain and Sensory Organs, Oral and Nasal Cavities, Neck and its Organs, Trunk, Thoracic Organs, Abdominal Organs, Retroperitoneal Organs, Upper Limb, and Lower Limb Anatomy.

As with any real cadaver pictures, care must be taken where the book is opened. While this is a superior resource for studying anatomy, it should not be opened in public areas such as buses or parks out of respect for those around you.  As young medical professionals, it is easy to overlook the sensitivity of this issue. However, we are charged with maintaining professional behavior, which includes restricting the sights found in this book to other medical professionals.

If you’re the type of person who needs to visualize real images to crystallize the learning, Rohen’s Atlas of Anatomy is the book for you.

 

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