Tag Archives: neuroscience

Careful Consideration: Pocket Neurology

Pocket Neurology LippincottPocket Neurology (also known as “The Yellow Book”) can be readily found in the white coats of many Neurology residents. Unlike its Medicine counterpart (The Green Book), Pocket Neurology does not seem to hold the same popularity among medical students. There are a few reasons for this. First, it hasn’t been around as long, and thus it hasn’t had time to built up the full extent of its reputation. Few attendings will readily reference it during rounds, and residents simply won’t expect students to own or have access to a copy. Second, Neurology is usually a clerkship of shorter duration compared to Internal Medicine in most medical schools, and therefore comprehensive pocket guides are less bang for the same buck.

What Pocket Neurology covers, it covers very well.  However the target audience for this title is not the same as for Pocket Medicine as a result of the focus in our medical education. We are taught the core principles of Internal Medicine from an early point on entering medical school, including history taking, physical examination, general findings, and many organ system courses focused on Internal Medicine subspecialties. It is because of this focus that new third year medical students can open a copy of Pocket Medicine and understand the more advanced topics without the need for referencing the basics.

This is not the case on a Neurology rotation, where most students are just starting to learn the specialty’s language, techniques, and the significance of common findings. For example, students may be frustrated if trying to use the book to assess the common presentations of migraine prodrome, despite a concise and comprehensive overview of headache differential diagnosis and workup. Getting past the basics quickly to fully utilize this book is highly recommended, as it will certainly be a strong resource to those who can wield it well.

As with all of the titles in the Pocket Notebook series, downsides include lack of space for annotation, and small print font, but these come with the territory of creating pocket reference guides.  Another consideration for this title specifically is an index section that is somewhat lacking.  Topics not contained within tidy concepts involve a good amount of searching in the appropriate chapter.  As a result, many residents will place labeled flags or earmarks on pages to quickly access commonly referenced topics.

Specific sections include neurologic emergencies, lesion localizing in clinical neurology, neuroimaging, vascular neurology, neurocritical care, acute intracranial hypertension, interventional neurology, seizures and other spells, electroencephalography (EEG), delirium, dementia, movement disorders, behavioral neurology, poisons and vitamin deficiencies, meningitis / encephalitis / brain abscesses, infectious diseases, headache, central nervous system vasculitis, pain, dizziness and deafness, demyeliminating diseases of the central nervous system, spine and spinal cord diseases, motor neuron diseases, peripheral neuropathy, radiculopathy and plexopathy, neuromuscular junction disorders, myopathy, electromyography (EMG), neuro-rheumatology, neuro-oncology, sleep medicine, pregnancy neurology, neuro-ophthalmology, consult issues, and selected pediatric disorders.

Overall, this is a title worth purchasing for all Neurology residents and medical students interested in the field. Medical students who wish to excel in their Neurology clerkship or enter a field that uses neurology such as Internal Medicine, Trauma, or Ophthalmology should consider purchasing Pocket Neurology with the above considerations, based on their personal preferences. This is probably not heavily needed for students who have no interest in neurology.

 

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Hidden Gem: Cindy Montana’s Interactive Neuroscience Review (free!)

Cindy Montana's Interactive Neuroscience Review (powerpoint)

Cindy Montana’s Interactive Neuroscience Review (powerpoint)

We recently received a question through the contact form about the previous neurology book review, Haines Neuroanatomy Atlas. It was recommended that Haines not be brought into the lab, and the question asked what resource should be used instead.  This post is the answer.

Coming into med school, you’ll be told of all the required books and be handed a syllabus.  However there are a few hidden resources hoarded and protected by the gunners of the class that generally aren’t as readily known.  Cindy Montana’s Interactive Neuroscience Review (very large powerpoint file!) is one such free gem.

After downloading the epic powerpoint presentation from the above link, be sure to view it in slide-show mode. This interactive and animated file is wired together much like the neurology system it teaches, and is horribly confusing and dysfunctional if the slides are just viewed outright.

The presentation really speaks for itself, but the animations are a fantastic and color-coded way to review the neuroanatomy pathways and basic concepts. This should not replace Haines Neuroanatomy Atlas, which is still highly recommended, but rather used as a complement and alternative.  This is perfect for places and times when taking out Haines just doesn’t work.  Most neuro labs have computers, which means you won’t have to dirty your own books.  Similarly, this is a great review for all the crammers and gunners who like to study on the go, as it can be pulled up on many smart phones.

There are many more hidden gems to come.  To all you gunners out there: you’re welcome.

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