Tag Archives: medical societies

National Residency Match Program Releases 2011 Match Statistics

The National Residency Match Program (NRMP) and Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) recently released the 2011 match statistics, which had not been previously updated since 2009. A copy of this latest version can be found here:
 

pdf icon2011 NRMP: Charting Outcomes in the Match
Characteristics of Applicants Who Matched to Their Preferred Specialty in the 2011 Main Residency Match – 4th edition

 
Specific data included in the NRMP match statistics includes:

  • number of applicants and positions in the main residency match
  • match rates by preferred specialty
  • number of different specialties ranked
  • USMLE Step 1 scores broken down by specialty
  • USMLE Step 2 scores broken down by specialty
  • Research experiences, abstracts, and presentations
  • number of work experiences
  • number of volunteer experiences
  • AOA rates by specialty
  • fourth years coming from schools with high amounts of NIH funding
  • fourth years with graduate degrees
  • all of the above information broken down by individual specialties

This last item is particularly helpful, as breakdowns include graphs that illustrate the percentage of fourth years who matched with a given USMLE Step 1 score. While this is not a perfect indicator of matching chances into your given field, the document as a whole is a good framework from which decisions can be made.

Posted in Core Clerkships, Elective Clerkships | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , |
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If You Must: Stedman’s Medical Dictionary

Stedman's Medical DictionaryAnother common mistake new medical students make is securing a medical dictionary. Usually these are used as incentives for signing up with one of the medical societies that want your money, but as a whole, they are not needed.  That’s not to say they are inaccurate or unhelpful, so much as outdated.  If you need to look up the definition of a specific medical term, chances are you will be effortlessly turning to Dr. Google or Wikipedia, instead of digging out a book from your shelf and using your mastery over alphabetical order and small print font.

With that being said, there is a small sub-population of people who will argue over which medical dictionary is the best out there. The fact is, they all get the job done to about the same degree and ease.  If you have to pick one because your medical book starter set wouldn’t be complete without it, I would say go with Stedman’s Medical Dictionary.  It’s the one that has been endorsed by the American Medical Association (AMA), and is one of their incentives for joining (as referenced above).  This not only means that you have the opportunity of obtaining it at no additional cost if you were to sign up with them anyway, but it also usually means that they are plentiful and freely given away by other med students who didn’t want it.

Again, it’s a common mistake to buy a medical dictionary.  They just aren’t needed.  But if you insist on getting one anyway, grab a copy of Stedman’s.

 

Posted in Books to Avoid, Pre-clinical Years | Tagged , , , , , , |
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