Tag Archives: How to Get Into Residency

How to Pick Individual Residency Programs: FREIDA

AMA FREIDA Online

It’s application season, and while this takes place every year, we only go through it once (thankfully), and thus the >25,000 participating med students are unfamiliar with the process. There are a TON of considerations on selecting individual residency programs to put on your ERAS application. It can seem daunting to wade through the list of endless programs out there unless you are certain of a smaller specialty from the start. We’re going to start with the basics, for those of you who are really lost.

First, head over to FREIDA Online. It’s a searchable sortable database produced by the American Medical Association with over 9000 residency and fellowship programs.  After scrolling to the bottom of and agreeing to their policies, users can select their desired specialty (including sub-specialties and combination residency programs), geographic area, program size, and academic affiliation. Results can be further filtered by benefits, ERAS or NRMP participation, research requirements, or specialty training tracks.

Searches can be saved for later viewing, although this is generally not necessary. For the more popular specialties such as Internal Medicine, paring down the perceived 3 billion possible choices by all of these options still produces a list that still feels like 567,902 programs. In actuality, you should come out with a list of less than 100. It’s still overwhelming, but much better than when you started. Trimming that list down to your “short list” of about 20 total programs to which you will apply. The final push should come from academic advisors in your desired field. If all else fails, post a question to this post, and we’ll have someone look into it.

AMA logo, producers of FREIDAHopefully though, FREIDA Online will be a highly useful first step. For those of you wondering, the AMA application name stands for “Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database.”  Sounds about right. Good luck on the application process!

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USMLE Step 1 Series: What Does My Step 1 Score Mean?!

Navigating Step 1 Scores

So it’s Wednesday afternoon. After weeks of waiting, you’ve been checking your e-mail today Q3minutes or hitting refresh on the NBME site repeatedly, and finally find what you’ve been seeking: the link to the PDF that you think determines everything.

You hastily open the file to find….   a large block of text. After the second it takes you to realize the date and your USMLE ID number at the top have nothing to do with your actual score, your eye catches a glimpse of the following:

Passing the USMLE Step 1 Exam

A good sign! You’ve joined the >90% of MD students (and about 80% of DO students trying for an allopathic-residency program) who passed. Congratulations! Chances are though, the page opened up just short of showing the box directly underneath the pass/fail: your score. In your excitement, you struggle with getting the mouse accurately (or was it precisely?) to the scroll bar to find…..  two numbers?  One of them a three digit score, the other a two digit score.  So…  you were aiming for some three digit goal, but now that you have passed and your score is permanent, what does it actually mean?!

In med school, the right answer usually starts with “it depends.” Let’s start with the three digit score, as that’s the important one that gets sent to residency programs with your application. As you know by now, certain medical specialties are more competitive than others. We’ll discuss interpreting below expected or failing scores in another post, but for now, you should start by checking out The National Residency Match Program (NRMP) and Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) document on charting match results.  It comes out around September each year and gives a breakdown of the previous year’s match statistics.  Right now, you’ll be most interested in the section that shows the average and distributions of Step 1 scores by specialty.

Is my Step 1 Score good?As for the two digit score, this is the number that is most likely to be misinterpreted. The first thing to know is that this is NOT a percentage nor a percentile. The former refers to the number of questions correct on the test divided by the total, and the latter (percentile) refers to how well you scored in relation to other students. The two digit score is neither. Don’t feel too confused – if you got this far, you already know you’re pretty smart. The two digit score is a near-arbitrary number, whereby the National Board of Medical Examiners deems the number 75 to be the cutoff for passing. This roughly corresponds to a three digit score of 188. Is it useful?  Not really.  It’s more historic than anything, and the confusion surrounding it is the reason why it is no longer sent with residency applications to program directors.

If you are interested in learning more about USMLE Step 1 percentages and percentiles, we strongly recommend checking out the MedStudentBooks.com USMLE Step 1 Percentile Calculator to help make some more sense of your score.

Congratulations to all those who passed – you’ve quite literally taken your first step to becoming a physician.

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