Tag Archives: Histology

The High Yield Series: Histopathology, Cell and Molecular Biology, & Embryology

High Yield Histopathology (2nd Ed), High Yield Cell and Molecular Biology (3rd Ed), and High Yield Embryology (4th Ed) are three books in a series whose purpose is to provide high yield topic and content review to prepare us for the boards.

Histopathology topics are covered in 30 chapters and about 300 pages, some of which cover nucleus, cell membrane, bone, blood, muscle, blood, thymus, small intestine, large intestine, respiratory system, eye, and ears.Cell and Molecular Biology topics are covered in about 140 pages consisting of 16 chapters, including, but not exclusively: chromosomal replication, meiosis, mitochondrial genome, mutations, proto-oncogenes, cell cycle, molecular biology techniques, and identification of human disease genes. Finally, the book on Embryology, consisting of about 140 pages, includes topics on overview of fertilization, development of organ systems, and teratology resulting from various external factors such as drug side effects.

These books are fairly comprehensive as far as review books go, but may not be the best books of choice for learning the material for the very first time. Certain topics may require reference or background information from a more comprehensive textbook. The range of topics covered in these books can be described as having more breadth than depth, although depth is generally sufficient for review purposes. Note that these books are in gray scale, which means if you need colorful pictures to keep you entertained, then you probably shouldn’t use these books since they are condensed material with black and white images. However, the inclusion and highlighting of clinically relevant concepts in the “Clinical Considerations” makes these books good sources for review, and helpful for the wards.

Perhaps one of the larger benefits is that these books are much shorter than their corresponding texts. Although many med students will tell you they are too dense or too much to read, other people will tell you that they are perfect for studying. The reason for this disagreement is that people tend to use these books in different ways, for different reasons, and with different backgrounds or expectations. These High Yield books do contain quite a bit of information, which may be considered too dense for those people who are simply looking for a flashcard style review book. However, people who use the High Yield series for learning the material for the first time may find that the information contained in it is insufficient to fully explain the concepts (which is an obvious feature with review books). Few review books are perfect, since there are so many possible topics to be covered, and any topic that one person studied but didn’t get tested on (either in class or on the boards) becomes “excessive material” even though another student may hit questions requiring that knowledge on their Step 1 exam. It’s important to disregard single outlier reports from other med students who took the boards before you. The boards can’t test everything every time.

The fact that these books are black and white makes them a less appealing to study from, but the material included are condensed and easily accessible. Again, they sometimes require some reference/background books from time to time, which is reasonable given that they are review books and not textbooks.

This subset of the High Yield series is good to use for a comprehensive review of the corresponding topics that are likely to be tested on the USMLE and preclinical med school classes. Using these titles by themselves for medical school curriculum may be insufficient, although using them as a “big picture” review for medical school exams is probably fine. Since medical schools rarely teach to the USMLE, it is prudent to keep in mind that these books may not necessarily produce the Honors that you may be aiming for. Use this book when studying for the USMLE, but in conjunction with First Aid and in ways mentioned elsewhere on this site. That way, you can better gauge the highest of High Yield topics and prioritize material to optimize learning for the boards.

 

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Best Online Histology Database: Boston University

Boston University Histology Learning SystemHistology has generally fallen out of favor and focus for many medical school curricula these days.  Some med schools still have dedicated histology courses and mandatory histo labs with ridiculously priced slide sets, but most have transitioned to incorporating histology within other broader classes, and offer newer digital versions of labs.  Due to this transition, as well as the driving field of pathology, countless databases and software packages have been developed to allow for histopathological visualization of electronic slides.

Whether your school’s applications allows for “real time” zooming and scrolling, or just splatters the screen with images, most software options are not particularly great at teaching the topic. All too commonly, we as med students have instructions that go along with slides and read something like “as it is clearly seen, the eosinophilic uptake shows…” Most of the time however, we have no idea what we are “clearly” looking at. Short of capturing a live histologist and forcing them to use the neon microscope arrows to directly point out key structures to make sense of it all, the next best thing is using a database that directly points to, circles, colors in, and directly labels what you need to know.

There are few free online databases out there, but the Histology Learning System from Boston University is among the best. Sure the background is a dull gray and the site navigation is a bit static, but the content and (more importantly) label system are a sure fire way to both learn and teach the material. This is especially useful when you find yourself needing to put together that annoying last minute power point presentation for some small group show-and-tell the next day.

The database breaks down all of histology by system, and also has a sitemap with every image listed.  Upon loading an image, users have the option of clicking on the LABEL button to figure out what they’re actually viewing, or click on a black rectangle on the image to increase magnification (enhance!) that structure. Some structures are rather straight forward and have no enhanced images, while others can go several layers deep.  Chances are, the histology professor or local guru at your medical school can recognize the BU histology database images on sight, as they are relatively well known in the community and characteristic.

Whether you need a complementary learning tool to be used with your class syllabus, a stand alone reference as you go through medical school, or a database of “normals” to contrast with pathology studying, the BU Histology website is highly recommended.

To prove your gunnery and attain bonus internet points, name the structures contained within this post by commenting here.

Boston University Histology Learning System

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